ACRL honors the 2013 award winners, part 2: A recognition of professional development

Casey Kinson


Baker receives CJCLS EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Leadership Award

Linda Baker, manager of reference, instruction, and collection development at the El Centro College Library, has been chosen to receive the Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Leadership Award.


Linda Baker

The $500 award and plaque, donated by EBSCO Information Services, will be presented to Baker during the CJCLS Awards Dinner at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago.

“The Awards Committee was impressed by Linda’s dedication to developing a model library instruction program and her commitment to being an active colleague with teaching faculty,” said Award Chair David Wright of Surry Community College. “One of her colleagues stated that ‘Linda is but one person, but her accomplishments as a librarian and leader at El Centro College cannot be surpassed by others.’”

Since 1983, Baker has been at El Centro College, part of the Dallas County Community College District. She has received numerous awards, including the Spirit of El Centro Award (2007).

For more information regarding the ACRL CJCLS EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Leadership Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/ebscoawards.

Palo Alto College Library Staff win CJCLS EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Award

The library staff at Palo Alto College has been chosen to receive the Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Award for their work on the project Library a la Carte.

The $500 award and plaque, donated by EBSCO Information Services, will be presented to Camille Fiorillo, chair of Library and Information Studies, and additional staff members during the CJCLS Awards Dinner at the ALA Annual Conference.

“The Library a la Carte program is innovative, focused on student retention, and showed the library’s partnership with other campus departments to promote library services,” said Award Chair David Wright of Surry Community College.

Providing face-to-face reference and instruction services away from the physical library, the Library a la Carte project is designed to meet students “where they are.” Using a modified electric golf cart, the librarians set up a library services “station” outside the student center. Reference librarians take turns on duty, instructing students on the use of library resources, including e-books and streaming video. They also promote the library’s Information Research Certificate program, a series of instruction sessions available in-person or online.


Library staff at Palo Alto College.

For more information regarding the ACRL CJCLS EBSCO Community College Learning Resources Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/ebscoawards.

Smith and Kohler receive CLS ProQuest Innovation in College Librarianship Award

Erin T. Smith and Jamie P. Kohler, both of the Westminster College McGill Library, have been named the recipients of the College Libraries Section (CLS) ProQuest Innovation in College Librarianship Award for their work on the Westminster College library mini golf orientation. Smith is the director of library services, and Kohler is the cataloging and collection management librarian.

This annual award honors an ALA member who has demonstrated a capacity for innovation in his or her work with undergraduates, instructors and/or the library community.

ProQuest will present the $3,000 award and plaque during the CLS program at the ALA Annual Conference.

Smith and Kohler prepared a mini golf program tied to a library orientation for first-year students. The students left the building with a working knowledge of where to find resources and the assurance that the library staff is available, approachable, and willing to do anything to help them.

“Westminster’s program was innovative, targeted to an undergraduate population, and easily replicated even if some other game or technique replaced mini golf,” said Award Committee Cochairs Amy E. Badertscher, director of library services at Kenyon College, and Jessica O’Brien, technology and learning support librarian at Lenoir-Rhyne University. “We love the idea of bringing in students who are in the early stages of their college career to learn where things are and how things work in the library.”


Erin T. Smith and Jamie P. Kohler

For more information regarding the ACRL CLS ProQuest Innovation in College Librarianship Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/clsproquest.

Hagedon and Sult win Instruction Section Innovation Award

Gregory (Mike) Hagedon, senior applications systems analyst/developer, and Leslie Sult, instructional services librarian, both of the University of Arizona (UA) Libraries, have been selected to receive the Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work on the software Guide on the Side, which helps instruction librarians create tutorials for database instruction.


Gregory (Mike) Hagedon

Leslie Sult

Sponsored by ProQuest, the annual award recognizes a project that demonstrates creative, innovative, or unique approaches to information literacy instruction or programming.

A prize of $3,000 and a plaque will be presented to Hagedon and Sult at the ALA Annual Conference.

“Understanding that many librarians are feeling the pressure to find methods to support student learning that do not require direct, librarian-led instruction, the UA Library’s Guide on the Side provides an excellent tutorial grounded in sound pedagogy that could significantly change the way libraries teach students how to use databases,” noted Award Committee Cochairs Erin L. Ellis of the University of Kansas and Robin Kear of the University of Pittsburgh. “The creators have made a version of the software open access and freely available to librarians to quickly create online, interactive tutorials for database instruction. This allows librarians to easily create tutorials that are both engaging to students and pedagogically sound. Guide on the Side serves as a model of the future of library instruction.”

For more information regarding the IS Innovation Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/innovationaward.

Cahoy wins IS Miriam Dudley Instruction Librarian Award

Ellysa Stern Cahoy, education and behavioral sciences librarian and assistant director at the Pennsylvania Center for the Book at Pennsylvania State University, is the winner of the Instruction Section’s (IS) Miriam Dudley Instruction Librarian Award. The award honors Miriam Dudley, whose efforts in the field of information literacy led to the formation of IS. The honor recognizes a librarian who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of instruction in a college or research library environment.


Ellysa Stern Cahoy

Cahoy will receive her $1,000 award, along with a plaque, at the IS program during the ALA Annual Conference.

“Ellysa Stern Cahoy has made significant contributions to the advancement of information literacy in academic libraries and beyond,” said IS Miriam Dudley Award Chair Stephanie A. Michel, reference and instruction librarian at the University of Portland. “Cahoy is nationally recognized for her work on students’ transition from school to college, which includes co-founding the Central Pennsylvania K–16 Information Literacy Network to build partnerships between K–12 and academic librarians.

“Cahoy’s extensive publications and presentations reflect her scholarship in areas including affective learning, digital literacy, K–16 transitions, and information literacy standards,” Michel added. “Her impressive record of professional service in the Instruction Section and within ACRL includes her influential role as chair of the Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force; this group’s recommendation for revising the widely used standards will have a lasting impact on all academic information literacy librarians. Her exemplary record of research and leadership in information literacy prove that she is, as one of her nominators stated, ‘a perfect model of what an instruction librarian can be.’”

For more information regarding the IS Miriam Dudley Instruction Librarian Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/miriamdudley.

Brunetti, Hofer, and Townsend win Instruction Section Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award

Korey Brunetti, associate librarian and collections coordinator at California State University (CSU)-East Bay, Amy R. Hofer, distance learning librarian at Portland State University, and Lori Townsend, learning services coordinator at the University of New Mexico (UNM), have been chosen as the winners of the Instruction Section (IS) Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award for their article “Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy,” published in 2011 by portal: Libraries and the Academy. The award recognizes an outstanding publication related to library instruction published in the past two years.


Korey Brunetti

The award, donated by Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., consists of a plaque and a cash prize of $3,000. Brunetti, Hofer, and Townsend will receive the award at the ALA Annual Conference.

“Any librarian who has struggled with turning theory into practice when it comes to information literacy instruction will appreciate this article,” said Award Committee Cochairs Erin Ellis of the University of Kansas and Robin Kear of the University of Pittsburgh. “The awards committee appreciates this excellent mix of the theoretical and practical, and believes it presents a new and exciting way to think of what and how we teach.


Amy R. Hofer

“It offers ‘a way to focus and prioritize instructional content’ in ways that lead to more engaged learning. The authors present a model through threshold concepts that can truly transform information literacy teaching, as well as students understanding of information literacy and its relevance. This article provides great potential in moving the conversation on effective information literacy teaching forward.”

Brunetti has taught Introduction to Information Literacy to first-year students at CSU-East Bay since 2006. He applied threshold concepts theory in the context of this class, and also adapted it for online delivery.


Lori Townsend

Hofer has taught information literacy to a variety of populations since 2007 and applies the threshold concepts approach developed with her coauthors to the fully online credit course that she currently teaches.

Townsend has taught information literacy for seven years. In her new position as learning services coordinator, she hopes to lead the UNM University Libraries in building an online curriculum informed by the threshold concepts approach.

For more information regarding the IS Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/publicationyear.

RBMS Leab Exhibition Award winners

The Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) has selected four winners and one honorable mention for the 2013 Katharine Kyes Leab and Daniel J. Leab “American Book Prices Current” Exhibition Awards.

The awards, funded by an endowment established by Katharine Kyes Leab and Daniel J. Leab, editors of “American Book Prices Current,” recognize outstanding printed exhibition catalogs and guides, and electronic exhibitions, produced by North America and Caribbean institutions. Certificates will be presented to each winner at the ALA Annual Conference.

The Division One (expensive) certificate was not awarded this year.

The Division Two (moderately expensive) winner is the Hoover Institution Library and Archives at Stanford University for “A Century of Change: China 1911–2011.”

“Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Chinese Revolution of 1911, the highly original content of this catalog, with its diverse and engaging variety of images, artifacts, and bilingual text, documents a century of tumult and change which results in the establishment of the Republic of China,” said Cherry Williams, chair of the RBMS Exhibition Awards Committee and curator of manuscripts at Indiana University. “The use of ivory and red color in the page layouts is a particularly effective organizing tool providing subtle definitions which flow from one section to the next. Highlighting a resource which may be unfamiliar to some, the catalog appeals to a broad constituency of visitors by providing an enticing glimpse into the rich holdings of the Hoover Institute.”

The Division Three (inexpensive) winner is “Medicine of the Maumee: A History of Health Care in Northwest Ohio,” submitted by the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections at the University of Toledo, Mercy College of Ohio, Mercy Toledo, and ProMedica Toledo.

“Drawing from a number of community resources, this broadly collaborative exhibition documents the evolution and practice of medicine and the establishment of health care systems in Northwest Ohio from the earliest settlements to the 21st century, serving as ‘a mirror reflecting the development of our community,’” remarked Williams. “In addition to recording the exhibition, the catalog functions as a valuable reference tool, utilizing both a table of contents and a bibliography for optimum user navigation and a resource for further study. The page layout, typography, and construction of the catalog allows for easy readability while the clear, concisely presented narrative within each chapter builds upon the previously presented material fulfilling the expressed goal of providing a humanistic interpretation which both educates and enlightens.”

The Division Four (brochures) winner is the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University for their brochure entitled “Remembering Shakespeare.”

“This well-designed and executed exhibition brochure highlights a collaborative endeavor which ‘offers a unique visual history of how the ‘Booke’ of Shakespeare was made and read,’” noted Williams. “Succinctly written, fresh, and original, the brochure provides a large amount of information in a small, user-friendly format, drawing in the uninitiated and nonscholarly as well as presenting a creative choice of full-bleed images.”

The Division Five (electronic exhibition) winner is the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas-Austin for “The Greenwich Village Bookshop Door: A Portal to Bohemia, 1920–1925,” available online at http://norman.hrc.utexas.edu/bookshop-door/home.cfm#1.

“This colorful, engaging and innovative electronic exhibition showcases a physical artifact, a door, to draw visitors into the manuscripts archive where they will discover a social network from the past: a neighborhood steeped in artistic and literary mystique,” stated Williams. “Showcasing excellent writing and extensive original research, the exhibition utilizes crowdsourcing to invite additional contributions while providing layer upon layer of information and scholarship.”

The Division Five (electronic exhibition) honorable mention is the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries for “Cuban Theater in Miami: 1960–1980,” available online at http://scholar.library.miami.edu/miamitheater/.

“Exemplifying a performance, this sleek, striking, and elegantly stylish electronic exhibition captures the spirit of the community it represents: theater as a microcosm for the Cuban diaspora experience and culture,” noted Williams. “Bilingual and utilizing a variety of integrated multimedia options, the exhibition successfully rethinks the traditional navigational structure to present an incredible depth of information about this compelling subject matter in order to bring it to a wider audience.”

For more information regarding the ACRL RBMS Katharine Kyes Leab and Daniel J. Leab “American Book Prices Current” Exhibition Awards, including a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/publicationawards/leabawards.

2013 ACRL STS Innovation Award goes to Distributed Data Curation Center

The Distributed Data Curation Center (D2C2), based in the Research Department of the Purdue University Libraries, has been selected as the recipient of the Science and Technology Section (STS) Innovation in Science and Technology Librarianship Award for their work on the Data Curation Profiles Toolkit.

The $3,000 cash award, donated by IEEE, will be presented during the ALA Annual Conference.

“The Data Curation Profiles Toolkit exemplifies innovation, providing a flexible and interactive framework for libraries to become involved in the data management needs of their campuses,” said Award Cochairs Elizabeth Berman of the University of Vermont and Rachel Borchardt of American University. “In particular, libraries and librarians can use this toolkit to begin meaningful conversations with faculty and administrators about the preservation of data, while building a community around data management.”


Michael Witt, Jake Carlson, and D. Scott Brandt

The Data Curation Profiles Toolkit is designed to capture requirements for specific data generated by researchers as articulated by the researchers themselves. It enables librarians and others to make informed decisions in working with data of this form, from this research area or subdiscipline. Profiles can be uploaded to the project’s Web site for public use. The project is available at http://datacurationprofiles.org/.

The Distributed Data Curation Center is coordinated by D. Scott Brandt, associate dean for research and professor, Jake Carlson, associate professor and data services specialist, and Michael Witt, assistant professor and interdisciplinary research librarian, all of Purdue University.

2013 ACRL STS Oberly Award goes to Scholl, Paster, and team

Jan Scholl and Amy Paster of Penn State University and their team, have been selected as the recipients of the Science and Technology Section (STS) Oberly Award for Bibliography in the Agricultural or Natural Sciences for their 4-H and Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) research databases.

The cash award and plaque will be presented to the team during the ALA Annual Conference.

“The Youth Development 4-H Database provides access to the breadth of Extension and experiment station research for 4-H programs, which are a hallmark of youth education across the country,” noted Award Cochairs Elizabeth Berman of the University of Vermont and Rachel Borchardt of American University. “This database represents a very rich set of information that researchers can employ in their own states and programs, and its significance is telling by its wide use both nationally and internationally.”


Amy Paster

These three databases contain a collection of citations relating to the fields of 4-H and youth development—one database for graduate and undergraduate studies; another with state, national, and experiment station research; and the third, the Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) database, is a similar database within the field of food and nutrition education. They include 4-H studies from 1911 to present and the EFNEP database from the more than 40 years it has been in existence. The databases are updated monthly.

Jan Scholl is the 4-H curriculum specialist and associate professor in the Agricultural, Economics, Sociology, and Education (AESE) Department and the College of Agricultural Sciences. Her 4-H work is part of Penn State Cooperative Extension. Amy Paster is head of the Life Sciences Library and associate librarian in the Penn State University Libraries. Others who have been involved with the project are: David Abler of By the Numbers (and professor in the AESE Department), Bruce Grinder, IT support specialist in the College of Agricultural Sciences, and Melanie Gardner, AgNIC Program at the National Agricultural Library. Representing the Penn State University Libraries are: Helen Smith, Linda Klimczyk, Sherry Lonsdale, and Wayne Ellenberger. Suzanne LeMenestral and Helen Chipman, National 4-H and EFNEP program leaders at USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, continue to publicize the program nationally.


Jan Scholl

The databases were created to support and further Cooperative Extension 4-H and EFNEP programs and research. The databases are available online at www.libraries.psu.edu/psul/lifesciences/agnic/Youth.html (4-H) and www.libraries.psu.edu/psul/lifesciences/agnic/EFNEP/EFNEPdatabase.html (EF-NEP).

The team has also received one of the four USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture national awards given in 2011 and the Internet Education Award by the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences in 2012.

The Oberly Award was established in 1923 in memory of Eunice Rockwood Oberly, librarian of the Bureau of Plant Industry, USDA from 1908 to 1921. She was the Bureau of Plant Industry’s representative to the Congressional Joint Commission on Reclassification of Government Employees and was instrumental in gaining a fairer recognition of library activities. This biennial award is given in odd-numbered years for the best English-language bibliography in the field of agriculture or a related science.

Olson wins 2013 ACRL WGSS Career Achievement Award

Hope Olson, professor at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee’s School of Information Studies, has been selected as the 2013 winner of the Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) Career Achievement Award. The award honors significant long-standing contributions to women’s studies in the field of librarianship over the course of a career.

A plaque will be presented to Olson at the WGSS program during the ALA Annual Conference.

“The committee selected Hope Olson based on her scholarship and teaching, especially the emphasis on feminism in information studies and librarianship,” said Award Chair Pamela Mann of St. Mary’s College of Maryland. “We were particularly impressed with the way she incorporated the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship into the classroom.”


Hope Olson

The award committee looked at her entire 20-plus year career and was impressed with her body of work, which included teaching, research, and service. Olson manages to include feminist theory and pedagogy in all aspects of her work, whether it is teaching a course on the political and cultural ramifications of subject classification at the School of Information Studies or publishing in refereed library science journals such as Library Quarterly or renowned women’s studies journals like Signs: Journal of Women in Culture in Society. Olson also has had a lasting influence in WGSS through the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship. This guide was created by WGSS and Olson incorporated it into her class, Feminism, Librarianship and Information (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee).

For more information regarding the WGSS Career Achievement Award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/wssachievement.

Gue wins 2013 ACRL WGSS Significant Achievement Award

Randy Gue, curator of modern political and historical collections at Emory University, is the winner of the Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) Award for Significant Achievement in Woman’s Studies Librarianship for his work in arranging, promoting, and publicizing the LGBT archives of Emory University’s Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (MARBL).

The WGSS award honors a significant or one-time contribution to women’s studies librarianship.

A plaque will be presented to Gue at the WGSS program during the ALA Annual Conference.

“The awards committee was impressed with Randy’s idea of having the MARBL’s LBGT collection featured in the Atlanta Pride Festival,” said Award Chair Pamela Mann of St. Mary’s College of Maryland.


Randy Gue

“This was an incredible opportunity to introduce the archives to members of the local LGBT community, whose histories are chronicled in the collection and demonstrates the value of libraries and archival collections to the public.

“Most of the attendees of the Pride Festival are not affiliated with Emory and had been unaware that a research library would collect this type of material,” noted Mann. “The booth at the festival was a great success. According to a number of his colleagues, hundreds of festival goers stopped by the booth, almost 2,000 postcards from the archive’s Gay Pulp fiction collection were given away and research visits started as early as the Monday following the event.”

For more information regarding the WGSS Award for Significant Achievement in Woman’s Studies Librarianship, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit www.ala.org/acrl/awards/achievementawards/WGSS_Significant_Achievement_Award.

Copyright © 2013 Casey Kinson

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