In the News

David Free

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Welcome to the June 2015 issue of C&RL News. Assessment of library services continues to be a major trend across academia. At the Princeton Theological Seminary Library, librarians created impact story logs to add “Micro assessing” of interactions to their assessment portfolio in order to present a more holistic picture of their work. Jennifer Gundry writes about their efforts in this issue.

In this month’s Scholarly Communication column, Najla Rettberg and Brigit Schmidt discuss “OpenAIRE,” an open access project designed to gather metadata of research output funded by the European Commission.

Academic libraries can often be places of stress, especially during times such as finals, and on a day-to-day basis with the distractions of constant information flow. At the University of Oklahoma, librarians installed a projected Sparq labyrinth to attempt to reduce stress among both library users and staff. Matt Cook and Janet Brennan Croft write about the project in their article “Interactive mindfulness technology.”

At Emerson College, librarians worked with campus partners to create a course design spa program to reduce faculty stress and rejuvenate course assignments and teaching. Karla Fribley outlines their “Massages in the library” program in this month’s issue. Yes, there were actual massages in addition to spa-themed course design services.

Rhonda Rosen of Loyola Marymount University discusses an ongoing, highly successful campus and community outreach program in her article “What’s a nice Jewish book group doing in a Catholic university?”

In this month’s The way I See It essay, Donald A. Barclay makes the case that it may be time to kill print textbook reserves in his piece “No reservations.”

Make sure to check out the other features and departments in this month’s issue, including full results of the 2015 ACRL election, Internet Resources on LGBT workplace protections by Donna Braquet, and a look back at ACRL in the 1970s as part of our continued celebration of the association’s 75th anniversary.

Thanks as always for reading the News.

Copyright 2015© American Library Association

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