In the News

David Free

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Welcome to the January 2014 issue of C&RL News. Many academic instruction librarians are experimenting with the flipped classroom model in information literacy sessions. Sarah Arnold-Garza takes a look at the effectiveness of flipped classrooms at Towson University’s Albert S. Cook Library by sharing the results of their formal assessment instructions sessions in this issue.

Continuing the instruction theme, Eamon C. Tewell provides tips for applying some techniques from the world of standup comedy to the library classroom. His article “What stand-up comedians teach us about library instruction” provides great advice of interacting with students, even if you don’t perceive yourself as particularly humorous.

Cate Calhoun discusses “Using Wikipedia in information literacy instruction” to help students with topic development, keyword identification, and as a source for finding additional resources in this issue’s The Way I See It Essay.

In this month’s ACRL TechConnect article “Finding friends for our first alumna,” Jessica Hagman and Janet Carleton outline an innovative use of social media at Ohio University to promote the library’s special collections and archives by creating a Twitter presence based on the diary of the institution’s first female graduate.

January 2014 marks the first online-only issue of ACRL’s scholarly research journal College & Research Libraries (C&RL). To keep the ACRL membership up-to-date on journal activities, a new department, C&RL Spotlight, launches this issue. Each month, editor Scott Walter will provide information on current contents, preprint articles, and other C&RL activities. All C&RL contents are freely available online at http://crl.acrl.org.

Make sure to check out the other features and departments, including Internet Resources on “The social and economic impact of hosting the Olympic Games” by Hiromi Kubo, new “Information literacy competency standards for nursing,” and a look at candidates for ACRL offices in 2014, in this issue as well.

Thanks as always for reading the News, and Happy New Year!

Copyright 2014© American Library Association

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