News from the Field

David Free


Wayne State University Library System brings Whistler’s Peacock Room into the digital realm

Wayne State University and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art recently announced the launch of a new online resource, The Story of the Beautiful: Freer, Whistler, and Their Points of Contact, a comprehensive guide to James McNeill Whistler’s Peacock Room and its dynamic history. The Peacock Room, an elaborately painted former dining room and one of the most famous masterpieces in the Freer’s collection, will celebrate its 90th anniversary of being on public view in 2013.


Image of Whistler’s Peacock Room.

Users can explore two 360-degree virtual versions of the room: one as it looked in Victorian London, filled with Chinese blue-and-white porcelain, the other as it appeared in 1908 after museum founder Charles Lang Freer reassembled it in his Detroit mansion and filled its shelves with subtly glazed ceramics from all over Asia. By clicking on each object in the room, visitors can zoom in on high-res images.

Interactive maps and timelines, supplemented by letters, diary entries, and vintage photographs from the Charles Lang Freer Papers, provide insight into Freer’s life story and his approach to collecting.

The Story of the Beautiful: Freer, Whistler, and Their Points of Contact is available at www.peacockroom.wayne.edu.

Ohio University partners to digitize Voinovich collections

The Ohio University Libraries and Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs, have partnered with the Center for Public History and Digital Humanities and the Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University to create an interactive, searchable digital archive known as The Voinovich Collections. The Omeka-based site draws from the collections of former Ohio Governor and U.S. Senator George V. Voinovich, offering scholars access to a variety of multimedia and primary source material.

Omeka is an innovative, open source Web-publishing platform used by libraries and museums to display archives, scholarly collections, and exhibitions. The platform allows for Web-content management, online exhibition systems, and archival digital collections systems to perform synchronously in one place. The collection is available at www.voinovichcollections.library.ohio.edu/.

IUPUI University Library electronics recycling program

The Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University (IUPUI) Library is launching a small electronics recycling effort as its latest program to support the campus commitment to sustainability. In cooperation with the local nonprofit RecycleForce, the library is now accepting used items such as cell phones, tablets, chargers, or curling irons—almost anything with a cord—which RecycleForce will dismantle and recycle. Students, staff, and community users can drop off such e-waste items at the library’s second-floor circulation desk during regular operating hours.

The recycling program is the latest in a number of changes in services, space, and planning that the IUPUI Library has instituted as green efforts in recent years. The Learning Spaces III collaborative study environment, which opened in 2012, was created using a range of renewable materials, such as cork and carpet made of recycled fibers. Library staff last year reset all public printers in the library to a double-sided printing default. This shift is estimated to save up to 1.2 million sheets of paper per year. Since 2009, a special group of library staff, known as the Green Team, has helped lead the unit’s commitment to environmental sustainability, planning, and implementing a number of changes to make a positive difference in the library and the campus community. The Green Team applied for and received an IUPUI “greening grant” to install water bottle filler stations at key points in the building. The Green Team has also collaborated with the student group DIGS, or Developing IUPUI Gardens Sustainably.

University of Idaho Library digitizes 2011-12 Turning of the Wheel Humanities Colloquium Series

The University of Idaho Library has released a new digital collection, Turning of the Wheel: The Interplay of the Unique and Universal. The Turning of the Wheel collection is a compilation of videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting more than 30 events that took place as part of the Turning of the Wheel Humanities Colloquium Series during the 2011–12 academic year. The series was directed by Rodney Frey, director of general education and professor of ethnography in the university’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

For each event, a University of Idaho community member offered his or her own response to the thematic question: “What is significance for you of the interplay between the particular/diverse/ unique and the shared/ universal/ubiquitous?” The collection features lectures, as well as plays, musical performances, panel discussions, and essay readings.

Turning of the Wheel can be viewed at www.lib.uidaho.edu/digital/turning/index.html.

ProQuest invites future information professionals to apply for annual scholarship

ProQuest is seeking applicants for its 2013 Roger K. Summit Scholarship. Celebrating its 20th anniversary and open to applicants from around the world, the $5,000 award is given annually to a promising graduate student in library and information sciences. The winner will be announced at the Special Libraries Association’s 2013 Annual Conference to be held June 9–11 in San Diego. The deadline to apply for the scholarship is April 30, 2013. To qualify, candidates must be enrolled in an accredited library or information sciences program. A panel of ProQuest information professionals will select the winner after reviewing academic achievement, interest in digital services, and faculty recommendations. Information and applications are available at www.proquest.com/en-US/aboutus/advocacy/summitscholar.shtml.

NISO launches initiative to develop standard for open access metadata and indicators

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) voting members have approved a new project to develop standardized bibliographic metadata and visual indicators to describe the accessibility of journal articles as well as potentially describe how “open” the item is. Many offerings are available from publishers under the banner of open access (OA), increased access, public access, or other descriptions; the terms offered vary between publishers and, in some cases, based on the funding organization of the author.

The project will focus initially on metadata elements that describe the readership rights associated with an OA article. Specifically, the NISO Working Group will determine the optimal mechanisms to describe and transmit the right, if any, an arbitrary user has to access a specific article from any Internet connection point. Recommendations will include a means for distribution and aggregation of this metadata in machine-readable form. The group will also consider the feasibility of incorporating information on re-use rights and the feasibility of reaching agreement on transmission of that data.

EBSCO releases CINAHL Complete

EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) has announced that CINAH, a research tool for nursing and allied health literature, will now provide additional content with the introduction of CINAHL Complete. The database will offer 71 percent more full-text journals than are available in the current CINAHLPlus with Full Text. With full-text coverage dating back to 1937, CINAHL Complete contains full text for more than 1,300 journals, many with no embargos, and more than 1,460 journals with searchable cited references. Additionally, there is deep full text for many titles with no embargoes, such as publications from the American Diabetes Association.

For more information, visit www.ebscohost.com/nursing/products/cinahl-databases/cinahl-complete.

Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication

ACRL announces the publication of Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication. Edited by Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley, this volume forges a new path that crosses boundaries between two vital areas of librarianship.

Davis-Kahl and Hensley explore how librarians at a variety of institutions can engage students and faculty in discussing topics such as open access, copyright, fair use, publishing models, the social and economic aspects of scholarship, and publishing through the lens of information literacy. Readers will come away with new ideas for forging partnerships with others in their organizations in order to enrich both information literacy and scholarly communication programs, activities, and services.


The 17 chapters in Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication represent the diversity and creativity in librarianship and aims to spark conversations about how to approach these topics using the case studies and interviews about programming, advocacy, outreach, and instruction. This volume is essential reading for librarians working in either information literacy or scholarly communication programs, along with library school students.

Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication is available for purchase in print, as an e-book, and as a print/ e-book bundle through the ALA Online Store; in print and for Kindle through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the United States or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Applications/nominations invited for RBM, PIL editors

ACRL is currently accepting applications, and nominations are invited, for the positions of editor of Rare Books & Manuscripts (RBM), a biannual research journal covering issues pertaining to special collections libraries and cultural heritage institutions and of Publications in Librarianship (PIL), an imprint of ACRL book publications.

The RBM editor is appointed for a three-year term, which may be renewed for two additional three year terms. Applicants must be a member of ALA and ACRL. Qualifications include professional experience in academic libraries, a record of scholarly publication, editing experience, an ability to meet publication deadlines, an understanding of the scholarly communication process, and a broad knowledge of the issues confronting academic libraries.

Appointment will be made by the ACRL Board of Directors following the 2013 ALA Annual Conference upon the recommendation of the search committee and the ACRL Publications Coordinating Committee. The incoming editor will become editordesignate upon appointment in July 2013 and assume full editorial responsibility in July 2014.

Appointed for a nonrenewable five-year term, the PIL editor works closely with the ACRL content strategist and PIL Editorial Board to acquire and develop appropriate research-based monographic publications. Applicants must be a current members of ALA and ACRL. Qualifications include professional experience in academic libraries, a record of scholarly publication, editing experience, a willingness to proactively seek content and proposals, effective communication skills and experience working with a group, and a broad knowledge of the issues confronting academic libraries.

Appointment will be made by the ACRL Board of Directors following the 2013 ALA Annual Conference upon the recommendation of the search committee and of the ACRL Publications Coordinating Committee. The incoming editor will become editordesignate upon appointment in July 2013 and assume full editorial responsibility in July 2014.

Finalists for both editorships will be interviewed at the 2013 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago.

Nominations or resumes and letters of application for either editorship, including the names of three references, should be sent to either RBM Search Committee or PIL Search Committee at the following address:

c/o Dawn Mueller ACRL 50 East Huron Street Chicago, IL 60611 E-mail:

The deadline for receipt of applications for both positions is April 30, 2013.

Tech Bits …

Brought to you by the ACRL ULS Technology in University Libraries Committee

Mind42 is an online mind-mapping tool helpful for library instruction, personal refection, and project planning. Mind42 makes it easy to lay out a topic, idea, or process, in classic nodes-and-branches format. Nodes can be different colors and text sizes, and they can store links, images, and to-do lists. To create your own mind maps, you just need to create a free account. Once you publish your mind maps, anyone can view them without an account, so it’s easy to demonstrate breaking down a research topic for students during instruction, or add visuals to a presentation. Mind42 also allows collaboration, so you can invite others to edit your map. This feature could support synchronous brainstorming for an online class or project groups. Try it out!

Sara Arnold-Garza Towson University

Mind42 mind42.com

Copyright © American Library Association 2013

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