In the News

David Free

Correspondence: E-mail:


Welcome to the December 2011 issue of C&RL News. Games are a big trend this time of year with the holiday season. Many libraries are also experimenting with a variety games and platforms to showcase their facilities and services and teach information literacy skills. California State University-Fresno librarians created an online orientation game in Blackboard to highlight their resources. Monica Fusich, Amanda Dinscore, Kimberley Smith, and Vang Vang write about “HML-IQ” in this month’s issue.

The University of Michigan’s “Bibliobouts” game uses online social gaming to collaboratively teach research skills. Karen Markey, Christopher Leeder, and Amy R. Hofer discuss the development and features of the game, along with its benefits for students. Lizz Zitron and Courtney Drew highlight Carthage College’s Amazing Race-style orientation game in their article “Get a clue.” In addition to being a creative take on the traditional scavenger hunt, the game provided an opportunity for collaboration between the library and student affairs.

In this month’s Scholarly Communication column, Caroline Sutton examines the economics and business models of open access scholarly publishing through the matrix of Chris Anderson’s book Free. Meagan Lacy discusses working as a liaison librarian in a discipline where she lacked subject knowledge in her The Way I See It essay, “The virtues of a committed dilettante.”

In addition to our feature articles, we take a look back at the past year this month with the 2010–2011 ACRL Annual Report. Looking to the future, discover how you can “Make a difference” in your association and profession by volunteering to serve on one of our many division or section committees.

Make sure to check out the other features and columns this month, including Internet Resources on “Cultural competency in health care” and information on the newly reinvented ACRL CLIPP publication program from the College Library Section.

Thanks as always for reading the News!

Copyright 2011© American Library Association

Article Views (2017)

No data available

Contact ACRL for article usage statistics from 2010-April 2017.